Could the South have won? [Solved] (2022)

How could the South have won the Civil War?

Put in a logical way, in order for the North to win the Civil War, it had to gain total military victory over the Confederacy. The South could win the war either by gaining military victory of its own or simply by continuing to exist. For as long as one Confederate flag flew defiantly somewhere, the South was winning.... read more ›

Could the South ever have won?

The South could 'win' the war by not losing,” writes McPherson, but “the North could win only by winning.” Although outnumbered and lacking the industrial resources of the North, the Confederacy was not without advantages of its own. It was vast—750,000 square miles the Federals would have to invade and conquer.... see details ›

Did the South almost win the war?

It has become an accepted historical fact that the South could not have won the American Civil War. The North's advantages in finance, population, railroads, manufacturing, technology, and naval assets, among others, are often cited as prohibitively decisive.... see more ›

Why did the South not win the war?

The most convincing 'internal' factor behind southern defeat was the very institution that prompted secession: slavery. Enslaved people fled to join the Union army, depriving the South of labour and strengthening the North by more than 100,000 soldiers. Even so, slavery was not in itself the cause of defeat.... see more ›

How long would slavery have lasted if the South won?

If the South Had Won the Civil War, Slavery Could Have Lasted Until the 20th Century. Aaron Sheehan-Dean is the Fred C. Frey Professor of Southern Studies at Louisiana State University.... see details ›

Would the South have won if they won Gettysburg?

One essay asks, "What if, at the Battle of Gettysburg, Lee had disengaged and fought a defensive battle from a stronger position?" The essay concluded that that would have resulted in "a decisive Confederate victory." Churchill speculated that if Lee had won at Gettysburg the Confederacy would have won the war.... view details ›

What would happen if the South won?

A successful Confederacy would be a zero-sum economy. In the world of Confederate, the economy would be a hierarchy, with no social mobility, since mobility among economic classes would open the door to economic mobility across racial lines.... view details ›

How close was the Confederacy to winning?

European investors gave the Confederacy approximately a 42 percent chance of victory prior to the battle of Gettysburg/Vicksburg. News of the severity of the two rebel defeats led to a sell-off in Confederate bonds. By the end of 1863, the probability of a Southern victory fell to about 15 percent."... view details ›

Could General Lee have won at Gettysburg?

Early extolled Lee's genius. In fact, Early claimed, Lee's Army of Northern Virginia would have won the Battle of Gettysburg, the turning point in the Civil War, if his orders had been obeyed.... read more ›

Why did the Confederacy think they could win?

They thought that a compromise and peace agreement could be reached after a short period of fighting. Second, the south was going to fight a defensive war. Third, the southern lifestyle made them familiar with firearms and horseback riding. Therefore they would be better soldiers than the northerners.... read more ›

Did the South have better generals?

Explanation: The south had much better leadership during the America Civil War than the North. Generals such as Robert E. Lee , Stonewall Jackson, and J. E. B. Stuart were well trained, skilled generals, contrasting to the inefeective generals of the North.... read more ›

What if the North lost the Civil War?

Its economy would have relatively declined, to the extent to be dependent of the North. Therefore, its political independence would have been weakened by the intervention of the North-America, as it has been in South-America. Migrations and walls would have arisen between the two sides.... see details ›

What advantages did the South have?

The South could produce all the food it needed, though transporting it to soldiers and civilians was a major problem. The South also had a great nucleus of trained officers. Seven of the eight military colleges in the country were in the South. The South also proved to be very resourceful.... see details ›

What advantages did the North have over the South?

The North had geographic advantages, too. It had more farms than the South to provide food for troops. Its land contained most of the country's iron, coal, copper, and gold. The North controlled the seas, and its 21,000 miles of railroad track allowed troops and supplies to be transported wherever they were needed.... see more ›

How did Southerners feel about losing the war?

Most white Southerners reacted to defeat and emancipation with dismay. Many families had suffered the loss of loved ones and the destruction of property. Some thought of leaving the South altogether, or retreated into nostalgia for the Old South and the Lost Cause of the Confederacy.... see details ›

Does slavery still exist?

Today, 167 countries still have some form of modern slavery, which affects an estimated 46 million people worldwide. Modern slavery can be difficult to detect and recognize in many cases.... continue reading ›

What if the South had been allowed to secede?

If the South had been allowed to secede, both North and South could have benefited. The North would have evolved into a country with social and economic policies similar to those of Canada or northern European countries without the continuing drag of a large undeveloped and inefficient South.... continue reading ›

Would the Civil War have happened without slavery?

There would not have been a civil war if slavery had not existed.... read more ›

How close was the Confederacy to winning?

European investors gave the Confederacy approximately a 42 percent chance of victory prior to the battle of Gettysburg/Vicksburg. News of the severity of the two rebel defeats led to a sell-off in Confederate bonds. By the end of 1863, the probability of a Southern victory fell to about 15 percent."... see more ›

What probably made it very difficult for the South to keep fighting?

Suggested answer: Based on the passage, it was probably very difficult for the South to keep fighting because they were running out of supplies. If General Lee has to ask for church bells to be melted down to make bullets, that probably meant that they were running out of supplies and could not fight for much longer.... see more ›

What advantages did the South have?

The South could produce all the food it needed, though transporting it to soldiers and civilians was a major problem. The South also had a great nucleus of trained officers. Seven of the eight military colleges in the country were in the South. The South also proved to be very resourceful.... read more ›

What if the South had won the Civil War How might your life be changed?

The United-States would have been unable to surpass the British Empire and to become the first industrial power. It would have weakened its economic and military powers, making the US unable to intervene in Europe in 1917 and change the course of war.... see details ›

Could General Lee have won at Gettysburg?

Early extolled Lee's genius. In fact, Early claimed, Lee's Army of Northern Virginia would have won the Battle of Gettysburg, the turning point in the Civil War, if his orders had been obeyed.... see details ›

Why did the Confederacy think they could win?

They thought that a compromise and peace agreement could be reached after a short period of fighting. Second, the south was going to fight a defensive war. Third, the southern lifestyle made them familiar with firearms and horseback riding. Therefore they would be better soldiers than the northerners.... see more ›

Did Great Britain help the Confederacy?

Many have argued that political and class allegiances determined British support for either the North or the South. According to this view, Britain's politically conservative aristocracy tended to support the Confederacy, due to the supposedly shared sensibilities of the English landed gentry and southern planters.... see more ›

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